Register for the Carbon Challenge!

  • To complete your registration, you must select and/or nominate challenges (maximum of 5) from the expandable list below (click on a tab and scroll down to see the options under each category).

    If there is a specific challenge that you would like to take on that is not listed under any of the categories, you can create one of your own under the 'Custom' tab.

    The idea for large one-off challenges (such as installing solar panels), is to use the 90-day Challenge period to research the product, save enough money to purchase the product, and then have the product installed. For all other challenges, the aim is to contribute to them daily over the entire period of the 90-day Challenge. To be eligible to win prizes, at least one challenge must be selected from the 'Energy' or 'Transport' tabs.

    Food

    • Balcony Garden

      Why? Reduce your food miles.
      How? A garden can be made just about anywhere - in a pot, window box, or even a polystyrene box - as long as it gets enough sun. Don't worry if your soil isn't very good - it can be easily improved with compost. Balcony gardens are ideal for growing the herbs that you use in your cooking! For tips and ideas, visit the Canberra Organic Grower's Society website: www.cogs.asn.au

    • Plant a Veggie & Herb Garden

      Why? Reduce your food miles.
      How? It's not necessary to be self-sufficient. Even a lemon tree, a couple of herbs and perhaps one or two easy-to-grow veggies will help you lessen the impact of your food. All you need to create a garden is a little bit of space, sunlight, healthy soil and enough water. For tips and ideas, visit the Canberra Organic Grower's Society website: www.cogs.asn.au

    • Start a No-Dig Garden

      Why? Reduce your food miles.
      How? No-dig gardens are great for creating gardens over lawns or weeds or when you have very poor soil with lots of clay or little top soil. Invented in the 1970s by Australian Esther Deans, the no-dig garden involves building up layers of different types of organic material. For tips and ideas, visit the Canberra Organic Grower's Society website: www.cogs.asn.au

    • Join a Community Garden

      Why? Reduce your food miles.
      How? Community gardens are ideal for the eager gardener who has no gardens! Anyone can join for a small annual fee. Individual Community Garden plots are currently available in Ainslie, for more information please contact sonya.tirtajaya@gmail.com.

    • Produce your own Eggs

      Why? By producing your own eggs, you eliminate the food miles involved in the transport of your eggs and you are also ensured that they are not nasty cage eggs, but free range!
      How? Buy chooks (or ducks) from local Farmer's Markets or rescue them from the RSPCA ACT www.rscpa-act.org.au.

    • Eat Seasonal & Local

      Why? If you're an early riser, shop at the Farmer's Markets (EPIC & Southside Farmer's Markets), or if their too early for you, Choku Bai Jo www.chokubaijo.com.au are a local farmer's market outlet, open Mon-Fri, 2pm-7pm (one in Nth Lyneham and one in Curtin). When buying processed foods, select those labeled 'Product of Australia' or with the 'Australian Made' logo.
      How? Shop at Farmer's Markets, Food Co-Operatives & when buying processed foods, select those labeled 'Product of Australia' or with the 'Australian Made' logo.

    • Choose Organic & Free Range Meat

      Why? While organic and free-range animals still burp and fart methane, because of the way they are farmed they do have a lower impact on the environment compared with their conventional cousins. The majority of Australia's cattle grazes on pasture instead of feedlot, and in that sense is free range. However, almost all Australian chicken and pork is intensively farmed. Organic meat, on the other hand, is produced from animals grazed on organically managed pastures or fed grain that is not genetically modified.
      How? Find a local butcher that sells organic & free-range meat.

    • Eat Less Meat

      Why? When it comes to environmental damage, the biggest culprit is beef cattle. This is partly because of the number of them - the vast majority of Australia's agricultural land is used for producing meat - but it is also because they are not suited to Australia's climate and soils. And worst of all, the produce massive amounts of greenhouse gases - by burping and farting! This is because the digestion processes of ruminants produce methane, which is a 21 times more powerful greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide.
      How? Switch from meat to vegetarian meals one or more days a week.

    • Go Vegetarian

      Why? See reasoning under 'Eat Less Meat'.
      How? Eliminate all meat (including seafood) from your diet. For tips and advice, see People for the Ethical Treatment of Animal (PETA)'s 'Vegetarian/Vegan Starter Kit' http://features.peta.org/VegetarianStarterKit/.

    • Go Vegan

      Why? See reasoning under 'Eat Less Meat'.
      How? Eliminate all meat (including seafood) from your diet. For tips and advice, see People for the Ethical Treatment of Animal (PETA)'s 'Vegetarian/Vegan Starter Kit' http://features.peta.org/VegetarianStarterKit/.

    Energy

    • Install Energy-Efficient Lights

      Why? Energy-efficient lights not only last a long time, but are 80 per cent more energy-efficient than a standard bulb.
      How? Replace all standard light bulbs in your house with energy-efficient lights (LEDs are currently the most efficient on the market).

    • Insulate Your Windows

      Why? While windows are great to look out of and good at keeping the rain from coming in, they do absolutely nothing about keeping out winter cold or summer heat.
      How? Double glazing will reduce heat loss by one third. It can be expensive to install, especially if retrofitting an existing house. Cheaper alternatives include acrylic panes, which are significantly cheaper than traditional double glazing and are also extremely efficient in cutting out noise. The acrylic pane is attached to the inside window via magnetic strips and can work with a variety of window styles. Membranes are another alternative which are as effective as double glazing but very cheap to install; one window costs only $20. They are a perfect solution for renters. Alternatively, floor-length, close-fitting, lined curtains with pelmets will also achieve a similar result.

    • Shade your Windows

      Why? Half the heat entering your house comes in via windows, so they need to be protected.
      How? Shade windows with eaves, verandahs, deciduous trees or vines to keep your house cool.

    • Heat Efficiently

      Why? Heating can use a lot of energy and increase your bills significantly, so make sure you select the best heating and cooling option for your situation.
      How? For tips and advice, see: http://www.sa.gov.au/subject/Water,+energy+and+environment/Energy/Energy+efficiency/Home+energy+efficiency/Heating+and+cooling/Energy+efficient+heating.

    • Install Roof Insulation

      Why? Insulation is a cost-effective way to save power in your home and save money at the same time. Up to 35 per cent of heat loss and gain from a house can be caused by a ceiling that's not insulated, which means you could be paying much more than necessary to heat and cool your home. Ceiling insulation keeps your home cooler in summer and warmer in winter. It helps your heating and cooling systems run more efficiently, saving you money and reducing our impact on the environment.
      How? Information on choosing insulation that's right for you can be found at: http://www.yourhome.gov.au/technical/fs47.html

    • Use a Clothesline

      Why? Line drying laundry conserves energy and helps to protect the environment by saving precious fossil fuels.
      How? If you have a backyard, use a clothesline. If you live in an apartment and don't have a communal clothes line, a retractable washing line can be installed across a balcony. For house and apartment dwellers alike, in wet weather portable clothing racks work best.

    • Seal Air Leaks

      Why? Air leaks around doors, windows, and electrical outlets lose as much heat, in the typical home as leaving an average-size window open all winter long.
      How? Determine where to seal by checking your fireplace, feeling around doors, windows, electrical, and plumbing outlets, and cracks between the foundation and the frame of the house where cold air may be coming in. A candle or incense stick can help you locate these cold air leaks. Purchase the following inexpensive items from your local hardware store and install where needed: weather stripping, outlet insulators, caulking, insulating foam, window putty, and door 'sweeps'. If you are a tenant, see if you can work out a plan with your landlord to deduct the cost of installation and materials from your rent.

    • Reduce Standby Power

      Why? Up to 10% of your electricity bill may be attributable to standby power.
      How? Identify the appliances that leak the most electricity such as televisions and DVD recorders and plug them into a power board with an on-off switch (available from most hardware stores). A few seconds every day to flip the switch.

    • Switch to Greenpower

      Why? About 82% of Australia's electricity is generated by coal-fired power plants, which are very inefficient and emit large quantities of greenhouse gases. About 11% of Australia's electricity is generated by gas-fired power plants, which also generate greenhouse gas emissions, although less so than coal-fired power plants. Only about 7% of Australian electricity is generated from renewable energy sources such as hydroelectric turbines, wind farms, and photovoltaic panels. These methods of electricity generation produce no ongoing greenhouse gas emissions but tend to produce more expensive electricity than coal-fired electricity, primarily because the costs of the damage done by generating electricity from coal are not incorporated in its price.
      How? If you purchase a Green Power product offered by a utility, it will place a small additional charge per kWh on your electricity bill (the figure will depend on what percentage of greenpower you select), and on your behalf the electricity supplier will buy the equivalent amount of electricity from renewable sources. So, the electricity transmitted to your house may come from anywhere on the grid, but the quantity of renewable electricity bought by the utility on your behalf is fed into the electricity grid as a whole, which has the same effect. For more information on connecting to GreenPower, contact your current electricity retailer.

    • Take a Home Energy Audit

      Why? Money invested in energy efficiency can reduce ongoing energy bills, increase the comfort of your home in summer and in winter, help the environment and can add to the value of your house.
      How? There are many steps you can take to reduce your household energy costs. Begin by becoming knowledgeable about where your house is on the path of energy efficiency by contacting an energy expert and getting an on-site audit. For just $30 a professional energy auditor from HEAT will visit your home to check the features of your house that affect your energy use and identify where savings can be made. You will receive a written report which will set out a plan to capture the energy savings identified. Visit: www.heat.net.au/home-energy-audits.

    • Act on the Advice of a Home Energy Audit

      Why? Money invested in energy efficiency can reduce ongoing energy bills, increase the comfort of your home in summer and in winter, help the environment and can add to the value of your house.
      How? Act upon the written report provided by HEAT which identifies the energy savings that can be made in your house.

    • Replace your Old Fridge

      Why? If your fridge is more than 10 years old, a new Energy Star fridge could reduce CO2 emissions by more than 227kg per year.
      How? Visit http://reg.energyrating.gov.au/comparator/product-types/28/search/ to help you select an energy efficient fridge. Be sure to recycle your old fridge - EzyScrap offer a free pick-up and recycling service, visit www.ezyscrap.com.au or phone 1800 555 753.

    • Recycle your Extra Fridge

      Why? Refrigerators operate 24/7, 365 days a year. So it's no surprise that after the hot water service, refrigerators are the second biggest consumers of energy in your home.
      How? Recycle your old fridge - EzyScrap offer a free pick-up and recycling service, visit www.ezyscrap.com.au or phone 1800 555 753.

    • Install a Solar Hot Water System

      Why? Installing a gas-boosted solar hot water system is the single most effective way you can reduce energy use in your home, and it will reduce your hot water bills by up to 90 per cent. While solar hot water systems have a higher upfront cost, they use so little energy to operate that in five years the entire cost of your system will be paid off.
      How? See http://au.tellus.com/solarinstallers.html to compare solar hot water installers online.

    • Install Solar Panels

      Why? Ultimately, the key to averting dangerous climate change is to shift from our use of fossil fuels to renewable energy.
      How? See the Federal Government Solar credits scheme http://www.climatechange.gov.au/en/government/initiatives/renewable-target/need-ret/solar-credits-faq.aspx for information on government assistance available, and http://au.tellus.com/solarinstallers.html to compare solar panel installers online.

    Waste

    • Reduce your Food Waste

      Why? Australians admit to throwing out a whopping $5.3 billion worth of food a year. It's not just the money that's being wasted - it's the resources that went into making the food. Some 2.2 million tonnes of food is wasted, and that's a problem since agriculture uses more resources than any other industry.
      How? Avoid wasting food by planning your shopping, understanding use-by dates, learning how to keep food fresh and ordering less food when you are out. Particularly focus on not wasting meat and dairy since they require the greatest amount of water and energy to produce. For tips and ideas, visit the NSW government's 'Love Food, Hate Waste' campaign page: http://www.livingthing.net.au/go/news/living-sustainably/back-issues-and-stories/issue-16-jul-2010/reduce-food-waste-save-money-and-our-environment.aspx.

    • Compost

      Why? 50 per cent of household garbage is food and garden waste. Compost heaps are the most efficient waste disposal units around. You can put a year's worth of kitchen scraps into a single 225-litre bin and still have space to add more. They are a great way to create nutrient-rich compost for your garden and at the same time halve the amount of waste going to landfill. This cuts down on greenhouse gas emissions because food waste in landfill doesn't properly decompose and instead creates methane - a greenhouse gas 21 times more potent than CO2.
      How? All you need to start is a compost bin, a small patch of land, and a small bucket with a lid for your kitchen scraps. For more detailed information on composting, visit: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/households/EasyCompost.htm

    • Start a Worm-Farm!

      Why? 50 per cent of household garbage is food and garden waste. Worm Farms are ideal if you live in a unit and are short of space. They are a great way to create nutrient-rich compost for your garden and at the same time reduce the amount of waste going to landfill. This cuts down on greenhouse gas emissions because food waste in landfill doesn't properly decompose and instead creates methane - a greenhouse gas 21 times more potent than CO2.
      How? To start you need a worm farm, worm bedding and lots of worms - all of which can be purchased at a garden centre. For more detailed information on starting a worm-fam, visit: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/households/EasyWormfarm.htm

    • Buy Less Stuff

      Why? It's not sustainable to continue to consume huge amounts of products (no matter how green they are) or use natural resources (no matter how organic).
      How? Buy less stuff (especially new stuff). Instead, rethink your necessities - it will also save you money! Learn to be content with what you already have, the necessities, with doing things you love, rather than having things.

    • Buy Second-Hand Goods

      Why? It's not sustainable to continue to consume huge amounts of products (no matter how green they are) or use natural resources (no matter how organic).
      How? There's a multitude of options to help you: 1. Opportunity Shops (Salvos, Vinnies); 2. Tiny's Green Shed (www.tinysgreenshed.com.au); 3. Material Pleasures (www.materialpleasures.com.au); 4. Freecycle (www.freecycle.org.au); 5. Clothes Swaps (held once or twice a year at the Canberra Environment Centre)

    • Use your Local Library

      Why? Books that are bought at a bookstore are made of raw materials, and then transported to the bookstore, which uses fossil fuels. The publishing industry is one of the world's largest polluting sectors ? for example, in 2008, the U.S. book and newspaper industries combined resulted in 125 million trees being cut down, which doesn't even get into chemicals used during production or the two industries' massive carbon footprint.
      How? Sign up for a library card at your local library and start borrowing!

    • Commit to Rethinking Waste

      Why? Everything in our homes has originally come from a limited natural resource. Natural resources include timber, coal, water, oil, bauxite, and limestone. These resources make items such as steel, paper, glass, and plastics.
      How? Follow the mantra of: Refuse, Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. A great website with ideas for reusing & recycling is: http://www.recyclethis.co.uk/archives.

    • Buy Recycled (post-consumer waste) Toilet Paper

      Why? Even if its plantation timber these trees could be used for far better things such as furniture or building materials rather than just for a temporary one time use of wiping up poop.
      How? Visit www.choice.com.au to help you make the most environmentally friendly toilet paper choices. With any recycled content product, look for _post-consumer waste? (such as used office paper). _Pre-consumer waste? is simply reprocessed off-cuts from a virgin product that has never left the factory floor.

    • Switch to Reusable Nappies

      Why? Even though reusable nappies consume resources such as water for washing, they are still viewed as a better environmental choice than traditional disposable nappies. Cloth nappies are good for recycling because they can be used again and again, not entering a landfill until they are nothing but rags.
      How? To learn more about reusable nappies, come visit the Canberra Environment Centre's 'Eco-Nappy Library' where you can have a look at the range of reusable nappies available today before deciding to purchase them. Contact 6248 0885 to make an appointment.

    • Use Reusable Shopping Bags

      Why? Plastic shopping bags are made from non-renewable natural resources such as crude oil, gas and coal (8.7 bags contain enough petroleum to drive your car 1km!). They can last in the environment for over 1,000 years. It's estimated that between 50 and 80 million new bags are entering the environment every year.
      How? Take your reusable shopping bags with you at all times - even for non-supermarket shopping. Envirosax are great little packs of reusable bags which fit neatly into a small pouch that you can pop into your backpack or handbag. See www.envirosax.com.au, and they can be purchased from various locations in Canberra including Dickson Nursery.

    • Say No to Fruit & Veggie Plastic Bags

      Why? See reasoning under 'Only use reusable shopping bags'
      How? Think twice before reaching for a plastic bag for your fruit and veggies in the first place - do they really need a plastic bag? Many fruits and veggies are fine to go straight into the shopping cart. For fruits and veg (such as grapes) which need a bag, why not make your own reusable bags out of soft mesh or buy them from Onya Bags www.onyabags.com.au.

    • Say No to Plastic Garbage Bags

      Why? See reasoning under 'Only use reusable shopping bags'
      How? See Planet Ark's list of alternatives at http://plasticbags.planetark.org/faqs/.

    Transport

    • Bike or Walk Short Trips

      Why? Half of all car trips, especially in Canberra, are really short, at only 5 kilometeres.
      How? Aim for one day a week which is car free, and instead walk or ride a bike!

    • Use Public Transport

      Why? Not everything we need can be conveniently found a couple of kilometres from home. Public transport is a more environmentally friendly option to consider in such circumstances.
      How? It's now easier than ever before to look up public transport timetables and services using web-based interactive journey planners that help you decide on the best options for travel. See: www.action.act.gov.au.

    • Carpool (Go 3:1)

      Why? Thousands of people travel from the same suburb to the same general workplace every day. Not only does carpooling cut down on greenhouse emissions and congestions but it saves heaps of money in petrol and parking.
      How? The challenge is to find someone to regularly car pool with. Some workplaces and universities have car pool systems.

    • Maintain your Car

      Why? Every litre of petrol used generates approximately 2.3kg of CO2. A tuned car improves fuel efficiency as much as 30%. This translates as a big opportunity for saving CO2 and fuel costs.
      How? Have your car serviced on a regular basis and inflate your tires to the pressure that is printed on them (always check and adjust the pressure before the tires are too warm).

    • Buy a Fuel-Efficient Car

      Why? Make a dramatic improvement in your CO2 emissions and save a considerable amount of money in petrol costs.
      How? Visit the Federal Government's green vehicle guide: www.greenvehicleguide.gov.au

    • Avoid Air Travel

      Why? Planes are the fastest growing source of emissions.
      How? Avoid air travel when possible.

    • Offset Your Flights

      Why? Planes are the fastest growing source of emissions.
      How? If you must fly, subscribe to a carbon offset scheme. See: http://www.co2australia.com.au/

    Water

    • Install Low Flow Shower Heads

      Why? A standard shower will use 15 - 25 litres of water per minute whereas an efficient shower head will use 6 - 7 litres per minute.
      How? Replace conventional showerheads with low-flow replacements. Ask your local hardware store for advice.

    • Install Tap Aerators

      Why? Reduce water flow by about 25% and produce a water stream that is every bit as good for washing dishes, hands, or fruits and vegetables.
      How? Insert aerators in taps. Ask your local hardware store for advice.

    • Install a Dual-Flush Toilet

      Why? Every time you use a traditional single-flush toilet, 11 litres of drinking quality water is wasted!
      How? Install a dual-flush cistern. It's simple for a plumber to do, however for a cheaper option, you can put a 2-litre plastic bottle of water inside the cistern. This will displace 2 litres of water reducing your water use. Alternatively the ACT Government offer a Free Toilet Replacement Service, see: http://www.livinggreener.gov.au/rebates-assistance/act/toilet-replacement-service.

    • Wash Dishes Efficiently

      Why? Each time you run your dishwasher, you produce approximately 1kg of CO2. Hand-washing dishes inefficiently produces approximately 1.5kg of CO2 per dishwashing. Through greater dishwashing efficiency you can reduce your CO2 footprint in this area by 25% or more.
      How? Run the dishwasher only when you have a full load. Scrape off food, but don't rinse dishes before loading. Use the energy-saving setting to dry dishes ('air dry' rather than 'heat dry'). If hand-washing, wash dishes in a tub of hot soapy water. Fill a second tub for rinsing dishes.

    • Wash Clothes Efficiently

      Why? 15 - 20% of water used by a household is in the laundry. Wash with a full load and you will save 10 litres of water each wash. Additionally, a full 90 per cent of the energy used in washing clothes goes toward heating the water, so it stands to reason that using less energy by washing in cold, unheated water would create significant environmental savings.
      How? Only put on a load of washing when you have a full load, and be sure to set the water temperature to 'cold'.

    • Install a Rainwater Tank

      Why? The benefit of rain water tanks are endless and of course ensures that your home becomes environmentally friendly. You can reduce the amount of water used from the Main's supply therefore reducing your drain on this precious resource. By reducing the demand on mains water to your home, you will reduce your water bills. For example, if 10mm of rain falls onto about 100m2 of your roof, you will collect about 1000 Litres of rain water into your water tank._ Just imagine, after 4 days of light rain you could easily harvest around 4000 litres of rainwater.
      How? The Rainwater Tank Rebate provides ACT households with a rebate of up to $1,000 to purchase and install a water tank. For more information, see: http://www.livinggreener.gov.au/rebates-assistance/act/water-tank-connection-rebates.

    • Connect Your Rainwater Tank

      Why? See reasoning under 'Install a rainwater tank'.
      How? The Rainwater Tank Rebate provides ACT households with a rebate of up to $600 to connect an existing tank to internal plumbing. An internal plumbing connection will usually connect your tank to a toilet or a washing machine inside your home. This internal connection lets you use your tank water to replace some mains water all year round and helps you reduce the amount of tap water you use. For more information, see: http://www.livinggreener.gov.au/rebates-assistance/act/water-tank-connection-rebates.

    Community

    • Join the Canberra Local Exchange Trading System (LETS)

      Why? The foundation philosophy of all LETS systems around the world is that each person has unique skills and attributes that are of value in their community. The value of the goods or services is decided by the individuals involved in the transaction. This value need not reflect that of the monetary system also in use in the community.
      How? LETS refers to Local Exchange Trading Systems that involve non-monetary transactions between members of the system, to exchange goods and services. For more information, visit http://canlets.org.au/.

    • Join Freecycle

      Why? The Freecycle Network? is made up of 5,027 groups with 8,870,920 members across the globe. It's a grassroots and entirely nonprofit movement of people who are giving (and getting) stuff for free in their own towns and thus keeping good stuff out of landfills.
      How? Membership is free, and everything posted must be FREE, legal and appropriate for all ages. To view the items being given away or sought in Canberra, you must be a member of the local group. For more information, or to sign-up, please visit: http://groups.freecycle.org/freecyclecanberra/

    • Join your Local SEE-Change Group

      Why? SEE-Change is a community, not-for-profit group that aims to inspire, inform and support action to reduce Canberra's ecological footprint. They have five active local groups who meet regularly in the Inner North, Inner South, Woden, Belconnen & Tuggeranong.
      How? For more information, visit: www.see-change.org.au.

    • Start a Sustainability Initiative at Work

      Why? It is natural to want to practice sustainable living in all aspects of your life, including at work. However, you may find that you are unable to do so at work, because there are no systems in place. Perhaps there is no recycling, no kitchen compost collections, no bike racks, or car pool schemes around etc. The options to improve your workplace are endless.
      How? Tips towards achieving your goal can be found at: http://inspireenterprise.com/2011/12/what-makes-a-sustainability-initiative-in-the-office-work/, or please get in touch with the Canberra Environment Centre as we may be able to help you as well. Contact projects@ecoaction.com.au or 6248 0885.

    • Volunteer for Conservation Volunteers Australia

      Why? Conservation Volunteers recruits volunteers to join important environmental and wildlife conservation projects. CVA's mission is: to attract and manage a force of volunteers in practical conservation projects for the betterment of the Australian Environment.
      How? For more information visit: http://actlandcare.org.au/regionalpartners/cva

    • Learn a New Skill

      Why? Make yourself more resourceful and learn a new skill that will assist you in leading a more sustainable lifestyle. Some examples, are learning to sew, compost, permaculture, cook vegetarian meals etc.
      How? The Canberra Institute of Technology (CIT) offers a range of short courses, for more information visit www.cit.edu.au.

    • Switch to an Ethical Superannuation Fund

      Why? Ethical investment or socially responsible investment is the practice of investing according to your own ethical criteria. These criteria may include, amongst other things, the impact of a company's products and services on the environment, the third world, employment standards, human rights and animal rights. With the large amounts of (your) money tied up in superannuation, ethical investors can have quite an impact if they choose to switch to ethical super funds. Ongoing studies are demonstrating the good returns that can be achieved from investing ethically, with the added satisfaction that you are benefiting society and the environment.
      How? www.australianethical.com.au/super is a good place to start.

    Make and choose your own challenge (optional)

    • Name:*

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    Green Is Good, by Rebecca Blackburn & Low Carbon Diet, by David Gershon have been referenced in compiling the above list of challenges.

  • Sorry, the Carbon Challenge closed to new sign ups at the end of March. But keep watching, we'll be sure to let you know if we run it again.